Keep your facility shining with proper cleaning techniques

When a prospective resident is looking for a facility to call home, there is nothing more off-putting than spotting the tell-tale signs of poor housekeeping. The presence of dirt and grime in a long-term care facility is not just an embarrassing turn-off, but a serious matter that can land your facility in hot water with surveyors and health inspectors. Much worse, poor environmental upkeep can put residents in danger. Many residents in long-term care are have poor or compromised health, which make them and their immune systems venerable to the presence of excessive germs, viruses, and bacteria. Exposure to an unclean or poorly disinfected environment could put them at risk for preventable illnesses and diseases. So, it is important to know how to properly clean as well as disinfect commonly used items in a nursing care environment. 
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers guidance on environmental infection control and cleaning of some common items in healthcare facilities. For common surfaces such as over-bed tables, counters and beds, the CDC advises cleaning on a regular basis in addition to when these surfaces are soiled. Spills should be cleaned up immediately and the items should be cleaned between residents and after discharges. Finally, these types of items should always be cleaned with an EPA-registered disinfectant/detergent according to the manufacturer’s instructions.
Toilets are a common item that can also be tremendous a source of dirt and germs. According to the CDC, they should be regularly cleaned on a schedule as well as when they are soiled. Toilets should also be cleaned between residents and after discharges.

Top to bottom cleaning

A good top to bottom cleaning should include floors and wall items. The CDC’s guidance states that items such as walls, blinds and curtains should be cleaned when dusty or soiled. Floors should be regularly cleaned with an EPA-registered disinfectant/detergent according to the manufacturer’s instructions. They should also be cleaned when soiled as well as between residents and after discharges. Blood and blood spills should be cleaned up with disposable towels followed by disinfecting with an intermediate-level germicide or EPA-registered germicide from EPA List D or E. Carpets and upholstery should be regularly vacuumed and shampooed and vacuums should have HEPA filters. Carpet that is continually damp should be removed within 72 hours. Blood or body substance spills should be cleaned up immediately and if any carpet tiles are contaminated with blood or body fluids, they should be replaced.
To learn more about how PharMedCo medical supplies can help you with your cleaning and infection control needs, go to www.turennepharmedco.com.

Reference:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Guidelines for Environmental Infection Control in Healthcare Facilities (2003): Recommendations of the Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC).

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